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Threat actors are increasingly shifting to “exotic” programming languages such as Go, Rust, Nim, and Dlang that can better circumvent conventional security protections, evade analysis, and hamper reverse engineering efforts.

“Malware authors are known for their ability to adapt and modify their skills and behaviours to take advantage of newer technologies,” said Eric Milam, Vice President of threat research at BlackBerry. “That tactic has multiple benefits from the development cycle and inherent lack of coverage from protective products.”

On the one hand, languages like Rust are more secure as they offer guarantees like memory-safe programming, but they can also be a double-edged sword when malware engineers abuse the same features designed to offer increased safeguards to their advantage, thereby making malware less susceptible to exploitation and thwart attempts to activate a kill-switch and render them powerless.

images from Hacker News